Need For Speed

For this assignment the task was to make a “musicless music video” by taking a music video, muting the audio and then using a variety of appropriate sound effects to make up the audio to the video.

My inspiration for this assignment was from the short example given on the assignment page giving examples of how they’ve replaced sounds and showing that I didn’t have to the whole video for a song. Alongside this the assignment reminded me of a very funny “bad lip reading” video I’d seen recently where the creator had replaced the original audio with his own lyrics/music to create a song. Through looking at a couple of music videos I had also thought that the best type of video to use would be one with quite a lot of action so I don’t have to find lengthy sound effects that fit and minimal artist singing footage since I didn’t want to have to replace speech.

I settled upon choosing a section of the music video to the song We’ll Be Coming Back by Calvin Harris and Example. I chose this because the selected section of just over a minute that is mainly action shots  which would be good to edit to. The video is also largely a car chase which is of interest to me meaning it would be quite fun to edit/match audio to and I do quite like the original song.

I started by downloading the video using this YouTube video downloader. I then imported the video into Sony Vegas Pro 12, dragged it onto the timeline and then muted the audio track to get rid of the video music. I then set about searching for the sound effects to edit into the video using YouTube to find videos with appropriate sounds and using this YouTube MP3 Downloader to download the audio for them.

Firstly I used this LaFerrari Hillclimb video to substitute audio for the Ferrari in the video using the different segments of it for when it’s shown in the video.  These segments were trimmed to the right lengths using the Trim and Split tool and positioned into place on the second audio track. The same process was done for this Porsche Onboard video to substitute audio for the Porsche in the video. The same process of splitting up the full audio to use segments of it was carried out and this audio was positioned on a third audio track. For the motorbike sound effects it was difficult to find any audio of them at slower speeds so I ended up using a small section of this video from a YouTuber I watch occasionally. Again this was trimmed and positioned on a separate audio track.

To fill in the remaining parts of the music video I used this Popup Headlight video for the sound effects for the headlight/engine turn off part in the video, this Paper Sound Effect video for the map and conversation parts, this Gravel Footsteps video for the conversation/bag burying part and this Car on Gravel video for when section when the car brakes/stops on gravel.

A screenshot of all of the audio tracks below the video track in the Sony Vegas project file can be seen below:

Sony Vegas Timeline.PNG

The finished Musicless Music Video can be seen below:

**If the video does not play on YouTube above because of Copyright Reasons please view it here**

 

The assignment was actually quite fun to do since I usually don’t like audio work. It was quite challenging to find appropriate sound effects to match in well with what’s being shown in the video which is why I used YouTube rather than other sound effect specific websites since there is more content to choose from. The other key to making it sound realistic which I aimed to do was by layering the sound effects as shown in the Sony Vegas screenshot to add depth. For example layering the different car/bike noises together while they’re on screen together.

To me the final video uploaded to YouTube doesn’t play because it’s blocked on copyright grounds which is slightly expected since the video visually is an unedited direct copy. This is why I’ve included another file link to it underneath. It’s understandable why the content owner has monetized the video but I think by most video uploaders is seen as a restriction on freedom of expression if this content is completey blocked to some people (244 countries in this case for my musicless music video). Other platforms have also started clamping down on content creators/remixers and putting these blocking features into place such as Instagram which have for video music and with Facebook planning to introduce one soon.

Content ID.PNG

 

Photoshop Gone Rogue

For this assignment the task was to create an animated mosaic about a movie using a single image that then splits up into a grid of 9 different animated GIF images of various scenes in the movie.

My inspiration for this was from the Jaws example on the assignment page and from my last mashup assignment which was Star Wars Rogue One related. Differing to the Jaws example I had thought that the mosaic would be more easily created if it was using a landscape still image for the start as the GIF animations would be landscape orientated shots from the movie. During the thought process for this I also took inspiration from the Jaws example in that the GIF animations would appear momentarily one after another rather than at the same time.

To make this Star Wars Rogue One GIF mosaic I first sourced the starting still image of from this website. I then set about souring the 9  GIF images using the Rogue One Trailer 1 and Trailer 2. I copied this links to these videos and then using GIPHY as seen below specified the start points and duration of the animation which would make the selected part of the video as a GIF image which I could then download.

capture

After I then had all of the images I then set about compiling them together to create the final product. I first attempted to use Adobe Photoshop since this allows the editing of GIFs in Timeline View however this didn’t work out in the end as inserting more than one GIF created  quite a few problems since Photoshop works by making each GIF frame a different layer in the project file. This resulted in hundreds of layers for only a couple of GIFs and meant that to position a GIF each every layer would have to be moved manually since only one layer (frame) is made visible at a time. Another issue was that the background still image layer would have to be manually toggled to visible for every frame in the animation. Some of these Photoshop issues can be seen in screenshot below:

Capture4.PNG

I then decided to move to Sony Vegas instead to compile the animated GIF images with the still image. After importing them into a project file the still image was inserted on the first track on the timeline and then the GIF images inserted on the 9 layers above so they would be overlaid on top of the image. Theses were positioned on the timeline at various points after 1 second of still image to create the simultaneous appearing transitions and the crop tool used to position them in a 9×9 grid. After this white rectangles were created using Photoshop and overlaid to create the outline grid which would mask any gaps in the GIF cropping and be present on the screen at all times like in the assignment example.

Below you can see the Sony Vegas project file with some of the tracks visible on the timeline:

Capture2.PNG

To then make this into a GIF animated image this Sony Vegas project was then rendered as an MP4 video (since Vegas does not allow exporting in GIF file format). This video was uploaded to this website which can be used to convert video files to animated GIF images. Using this online tool the options  as seen in the image below were selected to make sure the animated image plays smoothly in real time and that it is the highest quality possible. I also did re-render and re-convert the video once during the process to cut down on the still image timing at the start of the animation as originally it took too long before the GIF animations appeared.Capture3.PNG

The finished animated GIF mosaic can be seen below:gif-assignment

I think the finished animated mosaic is quite an eye-catching way to view scenes of a movie and definitely takes a couple of loops to view all of the different GIFs that make up the grid. So it could be better if reproduced that the GIF animations were more delayed between each starting or repeated to give the user more time to see what’s going on in them.

I chose this movie for this assignment because I have loved the Star Wars movies ever since I was a kid and particularly like this latest addition to the story-line because of the stunning cinematic shots and use of CGI. For example the top right GIF animated image shows the amazing CGI establishing shot of the movie which rolls just after the titles which I like as it seamlessly drops you into the plot. Through the still image and some of the animated GIFs I have shown some of various troopers within the movie which are of particular interest to me since they are the coolest looking “characters” within the universe and also because I am actually part way through building my own Shock Trooper armour from the third Star Wars movie. On the mosaic there is also some key storyline scenes in some of the GIFs alongside the scenes I liked/am interested in; although there wasn’t much video content online to turn into these animated GIFs because the movie is still very new so the choice was limited. One of my particular favourites is the middle animated GIF scene with the AT-ACT brushing off a rocket fired from one of the main characters Baze as this adds a hint of comedy in the middle of the main battle scene. As of writing this I’ve seen the movie twice already and will probably see it quite a few more times. During the second time of watching I was keeping an eye out for the scene shot in Canary Wharf Underground Station but still missed it!

Exploring London 28/01/17

For this assignment I had to create a video of the a “day in my life” which meant filming what I did or what happened during a particular day and editing it together into a video.

When thinking about this task I took inspiration from the YouTubers Casey Neistat and Sam “SeenThroughGlass” (who I ended up seeing while filming). When Casey used to create daily vlog videos I would find that his cinematic shots, especially the use of timelapses along with his general fast-paced editing style would make the videos engaging and fun to watch. I also wanted to take inspiration from his “intro sequence” to his daily vlogs where he would simply write the video location and date over the a particular shot. With Sam’s videos I take inspiration from the cinematic shots he uses to break up his vlog style shots since he always uses interesting camera angles and shots.

casey
Screenshot example of Casey Neistat’s opening sequence from this video.

When thinking about the video I wanted to create I had a few ideas of what I wanted to include: Firstly I didn’t particularly want to include myself talking to the camera since I don’t like doing it but instead use point-of-view shots to add a personal feel that it is of my day. This meant I would have to edit the cinematic shots to music as the assignment suggested to engage viewers while using interesting camera shots/angles to get the viewers attention.

To film the video I would be using my Samsung S4 phone, a GoPro Hero 4 and a Canon 700D camera which would potentially pose some issues with differing video looks and video quality. However I felt that this differing quality wouldn’t matter since the video was about making the video to show the content/story and not necessarily to make a polished flawless product. For example on many social media platforms like YouTube, Instagram & Snapchat it’s more important to users to make a bad quality post rather than not to post at all. For example how Casey Neistat keeps filming and uploads it when his external microphone breaks even though the sound quality is worse like in this video or adds in phone shots like in this vlog since it’s better to have the worse shot to make up the story rather than leave parts out because it’s not as high quality. Alongside this something about creating the video which would be difficult for me to do would be making the video solely out of video footage filmed over that one day (since I was doing other things rather than just focus on filming) and also to edit using the footage in roughly the same order it was filmed to create a logical story throughout the video which is not something that I usually do.

During the day while filming it was slightly tricky remembering to try and film every single thing; especially in front of other people in the street when “aimlessly filming” my surroundings. I think I managed this to an extent as I took quite a bit of footage however it would have been useful to have recorded more so that there was better choice during the editing.

For the edit of the video I mainly used Sony Vegas Pro 12 but however used Adobe Premiere CS6 for the editing of some of the timelapse sections. I started out by importing all of the video clips into Vegas and began putting the first few onto the timeline. After the first few I placed the intro scene using a timelapse clip that I sped up using the rate stretch tool in Premiere, added text over it and then went in search of a piece of music which could be faded in here for the rest of the video to be edited to. This chosen song was “Seinabo Sey – Pistols At Dawn (Lucian x Mickey Valen Remix)” which I’d heard before in this video and was good since it has quite regular beat/vocal changes which can be edited to. After this was inserted then I dragged the other video clips on the timeline and set about editing them together using a variety of tools such as the orange markers for positioning important cuts, trim tool for resizing clips and fade tool to fade between clips. Some of the video audio was then muted while some was isolated and increased in volume to make it audible above the music.

To create the best video possible I then set about stabilising (where possible) and colour correcting some of the video footage to make sure it looked as good as possible. Some of this colour correction was done using the standard “Sony Colour Corrector” plugin while some like the example below was done with the more advanced Magic Bullet Looks plugin.

 

colour-correction-exampleScreenshot of the video before (left) and after (right) the colour correction process.

Visible below is the finished Sony Vegas project file for the video which shows all of the used clips and editing within the timeline:

Timeline.PNG

 

Embedded below is the finished video assignment:

Sunset Views -#tdc1767

This daily create involved capturing the sunset in a video.

Above you can see a timelapse of the sunset from my window as you can see the setting sun reflecting in the building windows.

I created this video using a Canon 700D and an intervalometer  to take a photo every 10 seconds until it was completely dark outside. I then transferred these photos to a computer and imported them into Sony Vegas.

In the timeline every image was inserted in order as you can see below with each photo being 0.033 seconds long. This was then rendered  into a video clip which was uploaded to YouTube (as embedded above).

vegas

If you wish to view this daily create you can do so here: http://daily.ds106.us/tdc1767/

My submission: https://twitter.com/Hugh_B_/status/800343435513384960